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say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, shares seem to be fwllat. bundesbank announced it had cut its growth outlook for the country. in the u.s., the nasdaq snapped its losing streak yesterday with its first gain in five days. the dow was on pace for
't addressed the aid for sandy. it's now been six weeks after sandy and nothing has been done on that front. >> the gears move slowly, but the aide for andy will pass. it's just a question of when they get it done. and, of course, because that involves additional spending, that factors into the debt limit in the fiscal cliff negotiations, as well. >> john, do you know what is available to the president administratively, not legislatively in terms of gun regulation? >> first of all, all the issues related to enforcement of existing laws. >> what mayor bloomberg said is it was illegal weapons at that point that he was talking about. >> 77,000 for seven lives of something. would the gun lobby argue for astringent background checks for mental illness? >> probably. it depends on how it's framed and how it's enforced. but, you know, they've taken a pretty doctrine-aire view towards opposing anything under the nose under the camel's tent. feinstein is now going to reintroduce that bill. she passed it in the clinton administration. when it expired in 2004, george w. bush was president. he was nomin
disasters from the united states, $25 billion from superstorm sandy alone. >> nike capital agreed in principle to be acquired by getgo on the cash portion of the bid. knight capital agreed. the cash portion a prior bid increased. $3.75 a share and knight ceo, tom yois, would have been the chairman, instead be executive chairman. our guest in the first hour, one of wall street's most successful value investors continues to deliver for his clients. his fund is up 30% this year. joining us now, lee cooperman, chairman of omega advisories, delivering alpha advisory board and speaker, something we put on every year. i can hear all this stuff, i guess it was greatly exaggerated, the demise of investing and investing in general, and you can only get 5 or 6% if you're lucky and here you come in this past year with 30%. >> the year is not over. 7 1/2 trading days left and we're watching it closely. >> you've basically done this by staying positive for most of the year. >> positive most of the year and continuing mildly positive now, less positive than we have been. >> really? why on earth
of that is sandy. you can't disentangle it. i'm sure it would have been better if it weren't for the uncertainty. we saw how bad it was in the summer of '11 and it will be the same now. >> i very much agree with ian on this point, that the uncertainty is associated with the fiscal cliff is at least a percentage point on the fourth quarter. and could be more than that. it's just a lurking weight on the business sector. and if we are going to get this growth, i think we've got to have a little bit more certainty on taxes, on regulation, and the trajectory of fiscal policy going forward. >> what i hear you both saying, though, and you're talking about spending issue, and not worrying so much about that, but i also hear you saying it would be a big mistake to raise taxes. >> absolutely. yeah. >> but the top 2%, is that the least deleterious people to raise it on? >> yeah, it would be. but right now i'd prefer not to raise taxes on anybody. but if you're going to do it, then the people at the lowest propensity to consume -- >> you don't buy that small businesses fall under that? >> no, most small bus
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